Linguistics, Mental trips

Nigga, please

There is this thing about racism.

Let’s start my summary of meeting people from different races. I lived in this really small town – 10 thousand people – in Hungary. East-Hungary. 80’s. In the early 90’s there was a new eye-specialist in town. And he was black…ööö, colored, or Afro-American, nah. Everyone, like EVERYONE was staring at him, not because we didn’t like him, but he was the first flesh and blood black person, we ever saw in our lives. It was natural, that we stared at him – for us. However our curious looks might have scared him, because some years later he moved to a slightly bigger city, he couldn’t stand our village.

Years pass in the history of interculturalism, and in my life too and now I not only am not allowed to stare at people, who have any skin-color, but I am also not allowed to recognize that people have different skin-colors.

I can’t say things like someone having chocolate brown skin or coffee brown eyes, apparently the adjective makes the difference, which first I thought would be cute, people do hate. (they call me olive skinned though….it the difference then that olive is a noun and not an adjective?)

It is like – again – we’d have landed on the other side of the horse. From differentiating based on the color of the skin – or hair than, what about the blond jokes? – we try to close our eyes and don’t recognize the difference. We change the words in the history to let lose their meaning, and when we get used to the new word and attach to it the same old meaning, we change the word again. Political linguistics? Hm…interesting.

Disabled people get called differently abled, short ones vertically challanged – I know, just a joke -, but talking about someone’s hair or eye-color is still ok. Again blond-jokes? The green eyed devil?

I DO understand, that the movement of disregarding the skin-color was meant to let fall the prejudices, which people had against not white-skinned people, but I think, in our age some people just react on this too heavily.

It is like I should cover my mouth and my look, and should REALLY think – or not even think – about asking anyone of his origins – which might be amazing, but I can’t risk to seem racist, since all these people might be born here, and have no idea about their origins, although it is pretty clear, that anyone, who is not white skinned, has it’s origins somewhere else.

Americans seem to have solved this problem by attaching their origins in front of their nationality – there are Korean Americans, Latino Americans even Hungarian Americans. It is like they would like to keep their origins, here it seems, they want rather lose it. (What for? Are they ashamed of it? So should really I be careful or they?)

Another cultural – and rather strange – aspect for me is calling someone Asian in the UK. Asians are here the chocolate brown guys – no offense, I love that skin color, literally am positively racist toward any brown skin, it is exotic and warm for me, I can’t do less than just accepting my attraction. In my culture I called Asians the Chinese or Japanese people, generally those ones with the mandarin shaped eyes (again, it seems so racist, but it is the correct denomination, I think). (Should I call myself white then, when I talk about myself? I see nothing to hide in being Hungarian. Just playing the devil’s advocate though, East-European gave me problems, its meaning right now is being poor and stealing the jobs from the natives. Whoever these natives are, like second generation Indians, whose parents might have been seen as job-stealers as well, now the second generation just doesn’t think, and happily denominate anyone else, like they finally would be relieved to give their relay to someone else.)

Am just confused…the world is so different, it clearly is! I don’t want to see it as a mashed potato mixed with mashed peas, I want to see it, like it is: a rainbow!

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